Wimbledon Wrap-Up: Talk About a Shocker

 

Wimbledon Wrap-Up: Talk About a Shocker

 

Yes, the winners were beyond happy. But it may just be the failures and surprises that this Wimbledon brought that will be remembered by one and all.

 

When it comes to the men, the British are cheering today. Wimbledon – their reign, their pride – they now have it back in their hands after a seriously long drought. This drought has even lasted longer than the blistering one happening in New Mexico.

 

It took seventy-seven years, but the Brits can congratulate and honor Andy Murray for knocking off the top-ranked player (6-4, 7-5, 6-4), to give Britain back the Wimbledon championship. At only 26, Murray is the first British man to win Wimbledon since Fred Perry won three consecutive titles, ending in 1936.

 

For the women, everyone seemed to wait in hushed silence, wanting Sabine Lisicki (the 23rd seed) to continue her ‘Cinderella’ Wimbledon and take the entire thing. Unfortunately for Sabine, Marion Bartoli took the women’s singles final in only two sets.

 

And although the Brits winning Wimbledon back after 77 years and Bartoli beating ‘Cinderella’ was interesting, it was definitely the strange occurrences that unfolded that made Wimbledon a seriously exciting event.

 

It began with Serena Williams. After just claiming the title at the French Open, and going for thirty-four imgresmatches over 4½ months unbeaten – she lost it all to the 23rd-seed in an amazing upset. Serena stumbled slumped, and looked basically as if SHE was the 23rd-seed and not Numero Uno in the tennis world and with the fans. Sabine Lisicki of Germany took the game with surprised eyes, and the world wondered if they were about to watch a serious underdog take the whole thing.

 

Lisicki has been said to be mediocre at best. Yet every time she reaches the semifinals at Wimbledon, she beats the reigning French Open champion (Kuznetsova in 2009, Li Na in 2011, Sharapova in 2012, and now Williams). Apparently, that’s just her thing.

 

But Williams wasn’t all when it came to surprises.  Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Victoria Azarenka, and Sharapova all went gently into that goodnight – and way earlier than they were supposed to, as far as fans were concerned. All the ‘best of the best’ were done with Wimbledon by the third day.

 

Finding the right one to cheer for became a little difficult in this Wimbledon. It did do hearts good all over to see the British claim their own game after such a long time. And it was interesting and kind of depressing to see Sabine work so hard to knock out the best in all of tennis, just to watch her lose when it mattered the most. The ending of the women’s final was more than boring, with Bartoli easily taking her out in two sets.

 

But the men were more interesting. This was the first Grand Slam to feature what many refer to as the “Big Four” – Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal – yet some of the quartet seemed to be watching a movie inside their heads, completely oblivious to the fact that they were even at Wimbledon. Except, of course, for Murray.

 

Federer is a seven-time Wimbledon champion and came in as the odds-on favorite this time around as well. People are still literally stunned that this was the first time Federer failed to reach the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam since 2004, leaving fans wondering if his dominance over the game is, well…over.

 

Nadal just couldn’t deal with the grass court, fluctuating all over the place and attempting to cut across with not much luck. In addition, his serve seemed to be one of an ice cream man serving the neighborhood children, and not a star at Wimbledon.

 

In the end, congrats to Bartoli and Murray, congrats to the Brits, and congrats to the underdogs who made all the hopefuls out there realize that David really can beat Goliath.

This Moment in sports is sponsored by:  BeFirst Inc

 

Until Next Time, Everybody,

Amy